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Pictured: Andrew Paul Thomas (R) arrives at Swansea Crown Court. Tuesday 11 April 2017<br />
Re: Dyfed-Powys Police has used DNA evidence to secure a conviction against a man for handling stolen sheep – the first time evidence of its kind has been used in a conviction in Wales.<br />
Andrew Paul Thomas, aged 39, of Bryncethin Road, in Garnant, admitted the charge of handling stolen property, having previously pleaded not guilty on the first day of a trial at Swansea Crown Court. He is due to be sentenced on April 11.<br />
Forensic techniques usually reserved for humans were used to gather DNA from the sheep by the Animal Plant Health Agency, which formed crucial evidence to the prosecution case.<br />
The theft of 50 sheep from the Derwydd area of Ammanford was reported in January 2015, and the victim started his own enquiries to trace them in the farming community. He discovered 21 sheep suspected of being his, which had been sold at Llanybydder Livestock Market less than two weeks after being reported stolen. <br />
Ammanford officer PC Meirion Jenkins wanted to prove beyond reasonable doubt that the animals belonged to the victim. He sought advice from the force’s rural crime specialist Acting Inspector Matthew Howells, who assisted with the coordination of the use of DNA evidence by the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA).
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Pictured: Andrew Paul Thomas (R) arrives at Swansea Crown Court. Tuesday 11 April 2017
Re: Dyfed-Powys Police has used DNA evidence to secure a conviction against a man for handling stolen sheep – the first time evidence of its kind has been used in a conviction in Wales.
Andrew Paul Thomas, aged 39, of Bryncethin Road, in Garnant, admitted the charge of handling stolen property, having previously pleaded not guilty on the first day of a trial at Swansea Crown Court. He is...
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