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Pictured: Western flower thrips, showing bacteria in green. Symbiotic bacteria, here expressing green fluorescent protein, from the gut of the pest insect Western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis).<br />
Re: Tackling Zika: how bacteria can be a Trojan horse in fight against disease-bearing insects<br />
 Bacteria in the gut of disease-bearing insects – including the mosquito which carries the Zika virus - can be used as a Trojan horse to help control the insects’ population, new research at Swansea University has shown.    <br />
 The results showed declines in fertility of up to 100% and an increase of 60% in the mortality rate of larvae, amongst the insects studied.<br />
 The findings, which are published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, come as the World Health Organisation calls for all avenues to be explored, including research using genetic technology, in tackling the Zika virus.<br />
 The Swansea team’s findings offer the prospect of a much more targeted approach to insect control, targeting only the insect in question, and without the significant downsides of chemical pesticides, such as environmental damage, health risks, and insects becoming resistant.
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Pictured: Western flower thrips, showing bacteria in green. Symbiotic bacteria, here expressing green fluorescent protein, from the gut of the pest insect Western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis).
Re: Tackling Zika: how bacteria can be a Trojan horse in fight against disease-bearing insects
Bacteria in the gut of disease-bearing insects – including the mosquito which carries the Zika virus - can be used as a Trojan horse to help control the insects’...
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